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About Prue Hewett

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So far Prue Hewett has created 17 blog entries.

Green Dinosaur Variations

Ribbonwood Well-known to the timber community, 'Ribbonwood' is an attractively grained timber that was extremely restricted in its distribution.  The primitive angiosperm Idiospermum australiense, a.k.a. 'The Green Dinosaur', is an ever-reliable piece of evidence of rainforest continuity over a period spanning more than 170-million years.  It helps to explain why the Daintree Rainforest, on the eastern [...]

By | 2016-10-12T20:24:57+00:00 July 16th, 2016|Flora|0 Comments

Forest Flame (Strongylodon lucidus)

Forest Flame (Strongylodon lucidus) is a woody vine, also known as Pink Strongylodon.  It is flowering prolifically at the present, but its Daintree Rainforest flowers are reddish-orange.  The image above also shows a Golden Orb-weaver Spider Nephila pilipes) in the lower right corner, no doubt aiming to catch the butterflies and bees that will be attracted to the colourful [...]

By | 2016-10-12T20:25:07+00:00 April 28th, 2015|Flora|0 Comments

Northern Leaf-tailed Gecko

Northern leaf-tailed gecko (Salturarius cornutus) is Australia’s largest gecko with a length to 23-cm. It has spindly limbs, sharp-clawed toes and a very flat body with lichen-like blotches. It is arboreal and forages at night for insects among protective foliage where it is well camouflaged. Females usually lay one or two eggs in a crevice and after eight to [...]

By | 2016-10-12T20:25:07+00:00 April 22nd, 2015|Reptiles|0 Comments

Chameleon Gecko

Chameleon Gecko (Carphodactylus laevis) and Northern Leaf-tailed Gecko (Saltuaris cornutus) are two Geckos occasionally seen on a Cooper Creek Wilderness Nocturnal Wildlife Tour, from the Family Gekkonidaea, having Gondwanan ancestral forebears dating back 100-million years.  Chameleon Gecko (Carphodactylus laevis) is a species in a monotypic genus of Australian gecko.  It is the only member of its genus and is [...]

By | 2016-10-12T20:25:07+00:00 April 21st, 2015|Reptiles|0 Comments

Rainforest Deception – Katydids

Rainforest critters are masters of disguise.  The world's oldest rainforest is sure to exhibit a greater range of success stories, than other, younger forests. Katydids are families of insects where camouflage and mimicry avoids detection, yet the beauty of these insects and the near-perfection of the camouflage is incredible.  Approximately 6,400 species of Katydids within the [...]

By | 2016-10-12T20:25:07+00:00 March 23rd, 2015|Insects|0 Comments

Rainforest Deception – Spiders

Deception in Daintree Rainforest - Spiders Knowing the rainforest so that we can present its values to visitors from around the world has become our infinite vocation.  Secretive, obscure, cryptic, camouflaged, mimicking are terms that describe strategies of rainforest deception that are employed by many of our critters to avoid detection.  The enrichment of our [...]

By | 2016-10-12T20:25:07+00:00 March 23rd, 2015|Spiders|0 Comments

Fan-tastic Story of Success

Simplicity, efficiency, endurance and connection seem to be recurring themes within our forests.  What factors contribute to the continuance of the spectacular fan palms, Licuala ramsayi that have spanned 170million years?  Fossil records of these plants have been found in Antarctica and are acknowledged as ancient Gondwana plants. The leaf design is incredibly smart.  Its [...]

By | 2016-10-12T20:25:26+00:00 March 21st, 2015|Flora|0 Comments

Licuala Forests

The timeless grandeur of rainforest giants, individually exceeding a thousand years old, form a primary canopy above, that excludes much of the sunlight, whilst a secondary canopy of fan palms, Licuala ramsayii forms a vaulted ceiling of green parasols under the shadow of the overarching big trees.  Strength, beauty, eternity, spaciousness and diversity, have an [...]

By | 2015-03-23T10:59:24+00:00 March 18th, 2015|Flora|0 Comments

Living with Cassowaries Part 1.

Cassowaries and humans co-exist in the rainforest. We share responsibility for the protection and conservation of Australia’s World Heritage Area. Cassowaries ingest rainforest fruit, process them through their powerful digestive systems and excrete them in a form that facilitates their germination. […]

By | 2016-10-12T20:25:26+00:00 March 16th, 2015|Articles|0 Comments