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Values

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Evolutionary Attraction?

What evolutionary attraction would lead fungi to produce light?  According to the Wet Tropics Management Authority, no one knows why they bioluminescence, but across an incredible evolutionary history, and in circumstances of such consistent windlessness, fungi appears to have adapted by mimicking the reproductive visual cue of the flightless female firefly. Emitting an identical light, from an identical chemical reaction, the [...]

By |2015-05-09T19:45:39+10:00May 9th, 2015|Flora|0 Comments

Daintree Tree Frogs

Daintree Tree Frogs have become synonymous with environmentalism. Their beauty, diversity and susceptability to environmental stresses, have elevated their importance to a level of almost universal appeal. Every now and then we are advised that certain species are disappearing in the wild. Green-eyed Tree Frog (Litoria genimaculata) is one species that attracts such concern. I [...]

By |2016-10-12T20:25:07+10:00May 9th, 2015|Fauna, Frogs|0 Comments

Breakfast with the Boyd’s

Boyd's Forest Dragon (Hypsilurus boydii), resplendent in his camouflaged coating and ornate headdress, had a fortuitous visit this morning.  A Giant Tropical Mantid (Hierodula majuscula) made the mistake of walking into sight of the ever-vigilant dragon and swiftly became breakfast. Boyd”s Forest Dragons are endemic to the rainforests of Australia’s Wet Tropics. They can reach a total length of 54-cm and [...]

By |2016-10-12T20:25:07+10:00May 4th, 2015|Insects, Reptiles|0 Comments

Forest Flame (Strongylodon lucidus)

Forest Flame (Strongylodon lucidus) is a woody vine, also known as Pink Strongylodon.  It is flowering prolifically at the present, but its Daintree Rainforest flowers are reddish-orange.  The image above also shows a Golden Orb-weaver Spider Nephila pilipes) in the lower right corner, no doubt aiming to catch the butterflies and bees that will be attracted to the colourful [...]

By |2016-10-12T20:25:07+10:00April 28th, 2015|Flora|0 Comments

Northern Leaf-tailed Gecko

Northern leaf-tailed gecko (Salturarius cornutus) is Australia’s largest gecko with a length to 23-cm. It has spindly limbs, sharp-clawed toes and a very flat body with lichen-like blotches. It is arboreal and forages at night for insects among protective foliage where it is well camouflaged. Females usually lay one or two eggs in a crevice and after eight to [...]

By |2016-10-12T20:25:07+10:00April 22nd, 2015|Reptiles|0 Comments

Chameleon Gecko

Chameleon Gecko (Carphodactylus laevis) and Northern Leaf-tailed Gecko (Saltuaris cornutus) are two Geckos occasionally seen on a Cooper Creek Wilderness Nocturnal Wildlife Tour, from the Family Gekkonidaea, having Gondwanan ancestral forebears dating back 100-million years.  Chameleon Gecko (Carphodactylus laevis) is a species in a monotypic genus of Australian gecko.  It is the only member of its genus and is [...]

By |2016-10-12T20:25:07+10:00April 21st, 2015|Reptiles|0 Comments

Rainforest Deception – Katydids

Rainforest critters are masters of disguise.  The world's oldest rainforest is sure to exhibit a greater range of success stories, than other, younger forests. Katydids are families of insects where camouflage and mimicry avoids detection, yet the beauty of these insects and the near-perfection of the camouflage is incredible.  Approximately 6,400 species of Katydids within the [...]

By |2016-10-12T20:25:07+10:00March 23rd, 2015|Insects|0 Comments

Rainforest Deception – Spiders

Deception in Daintree Rainforest - Spiders Knowing the rainforest so that we can present its values to visitors from around the world has become our infinite vocation.  Secretive, obscure, cryptic, camouflaged, mimicking are terms that describe strategies of rainforest deception that are employed by many of our critters to avoid detection.  The enrichment of our [...]

By |2016-10-12T20:25:07+10:00March 23rd, 2015|Spiders|0 Comments